Alternative Transportation

by Fire Girl Jess on July 21, 2014

Guide Rory Paterson aboard an Mi-8 on a supply run downriver. Ponoi River, Russia.

Guide Rory Paterson aboard an Mi-8 on a supply run downriver. Ponoi River, Russia.

Digging through the Russia archives for images for a submission. Came across this… different methods of transportation, from a few years ago.

Can honestly say I miss the hell out of riding the Mi-8s.

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The Vermont Chronicles 20 July: The IFTD Post

by Fire Girl Jess on July 20, 2014

Head on over to Chi Wulff for a bit more reporting on IFTD… hopefully you’re delving into it armed with a mug brim-full of black coffee and a fly rod (and water) near at hand.

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Reporting From IFTD

by Fire Girl Jess on July 17, 2014

The Orvis booth in full-on work mode, IFTD 2014.

The Orvis booth in full-on work mode, IFTD 2014.

I could grow to like Florida. I’m reporting from an outside patio… dusk is falling, I can hear live music from somewhere on the hotel compound, and it’s humid and warm and lovely. Big, puffy gulf clouds puff over the horizon and pink sunlight tints the skyline.

Somehow it’s a kind of weird, zen fit for a fishing industry gathering.

While I haven’t ventured much into ICAST land (conventional fishing still puzzles me, and I can’t throw a spinning rod to save my life, except as potentially a javelin), IFTD has proven to be a productive event for the week. It’s an idea-gathering ground of marketing mojo, press prowess, and pow-wow goodness with industry folk. Talk about a way to reenergize the writing at the day job.

I’ve been working the show strictly in an Orvis capacity, and so have not been wearing my freelance hat, nor have I been toting around the camera kit. I feel rather naked without; my shoulder feels pretty damn empty without a camera strap hugging on, and my fingers itch for the well-worn grip of the Canon.

That said, it’s been awesome to work the Orvis booth, meet some of our dealers, and talk with folk from all sides of the industry. Orvis introduced some pretty rockin’ new product for 2015, and after months spent on naming and marketing for these products, it’s pretty exciting to hear to public’s thoughts.

So, with minimal reporting, here are a few iPhone photos from the show.

Thanks to everyone who stopped by to talk. I finally met, face-to-face, a lot of folks I’ve worked with over the years, once more proving there is nothing that replaces a good, old-fashioned hand shake and face time. Looking forward to catching all you guys again in the coming months.

A plethora of rather sobering news coming from around the world today—I took a phone call from a friend with boots on the ground in the Gaza Strip this morning—served as a good reminder to many present that, at the end of the day, it’s only fishing. We work in a pretty awesome industry, filled with some incredible people (met even more today), but the real world never fails to remind us of the sport’s place in the big scene of things.

So here’s to those good days on the water.

The IFTD casting pond.

The IFTD casting pond.

The latest and greatest: Orvis Recon!

The latest from Orvis for 2015: the Recon.

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Off to IFTD with Orvis

by Fire Girl Jess on July 14, 2014

Three Frenchmen take advantage of the day's last light. Missouri River, Montana.

Three Frenchmen take advantage of the day’s last light. Missouri River, Montana.

Bags are packed and I’m blazing through a night of work before heading off to join the rest of the Orvis Rod & Tackle gang tomorrow at the International Fly Tackle Dealer (IFTD) Show in Orlando. Looking forward to hitting the pavement with the guys I work with on a daily basis and seeing what’s new in the fly fishing realm (and showcase some of Orvis’ new 2015 product). Should be a busy week.

If you’re there, give me a shout! (Or, alternately, look for the only girl with the Orvis group.) Hope to see you there!

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Back into the Ring: The Vermont Summer Festival

by Fire Girl Jess on July 13, 2014

McGlothlin_FGP_Horse_VYesterday was spent working in, for me, a rather old arena (pardon the pun… couldn’t resist). Some of you will know by now that, before writing and photography became a full-time career, I used to make a living in the equestrian industry. Said career involved managing a large boarding / training barn, a wide variety of lesson clients, and a string of horses in training.

After a stint working in Europe within that industry, I burned out. And burned out hard. The brain needed something different, and eventually that transition landed me where I am today. (And who the hell would have ever guessed Vermont?)

That said, some of my favorite assignments over the years have come in the form of something horsey—covering famed the Masters Tournament at Spruce Meadows in Calgary, part of the World Cup of Eventing with Event at Rebecca Farm in Montana, and a plethora of rodeos and rough outs along the way. I find myself frequently writing for equestrian magazines, dithering on about a new form of equine conditioning or a new industry trend.

Horses always come back one way or another.

And so, it was with a gleeful step that I made my way to the Vermont Summer Festival yesterday, held an arduous trek of about ten minutes from my apartment here in Manchester. (Small town win.) Photographing jumping horses is something I know and I love, and so, all in all, it was a pretty relaxed work day.

I have discovered a certain proclivity to a particular type of horse—those that most resemble my old competition partner. He was big and bay and rawboned, with monstrous ears and a bold Roman nose. Uploading images yesterday I discovered an inordinate amount of images that reflected that type of mount.

I also fell into the old habit of making internal bets as a horse enters the ring, debating if it will be a clean round or not. Force of habit—long years in the industry make reading equine quality second nature.

The Vermont Summer Festival runs from 1 July to 10 August; suffice to say I’m feeling pretty happy and pretty spoiled to have this kind of equestrian community in town for six weeks. It’s an interesting experience—I came home from the show yesterday bearing the signature scents of a horse show… sweat, the sweet smell of well-cared-for horses, and fly spray. Nostalgia reigned. At the same time, watching the trainers and the grooms and the riders who only ride as a social, society trend, it made me very much not miss that lifestyle.

Thought-provoking, at any rate.

The show’s weekly $30,000 Grand Prix takes place every Saturday, and I was able to catch it yesterday. Despite the hot, sticky weather, horses and riders looked to be fit and in fighting form. The course was wide—lots of odd half strides where the riders had to know their horses and the mount’s ability to either lengthen or shorten strides in between combinations.

As always, it was a pleasure to be back ringside. I’m looking forward to hitting the Vermont Summer Festival several more times this summer. Look for the images in an equestrian publication near you!

Off to the International Fly Tackle Dealer (IFTD) Show in Orlando this week. If you’re there, give me a shout! Looking forward to networking and meeting friends, both old and new.

McGlothlin_FGP_Horse_VIMcGlothlin_FGP_Horse_IIIMcGlothlin_FGP_Horse_IIMcGlothlin_FGP_Horse_IMcGlothlin_FGP_Horse_IV

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The traveling veteran, the Fire Girl Subaru, on an adventure in the Gallatin Range, southwestern Montana.

The traveling veteran, the Fire Girl Subaru, on an adventure in the Gallatin Range, southwestern Montana.

Contrary to general concerns expressed in the bevy of emails I’ve received due to the lack of posting over the past week, I’m still here. Alive. Kicking. Running like mad trying to keep up with life. (And thanks for the concern, gang.)

Nothing new there.

But, there is a (semi) valid excuse for the internet silence. The Fire Girl Suby, my well-loved and well-traveled partner of the past several years, has officially bitten the dust. Hard. Extremely hard. As in KIA.

The old Subaru creaked and rattled through many an adventure. We lost a rear door panel trying to shimmy through a canyon in south Texas. Chased forest fires in Yellowstone and gained entrance to more “emergency services only” areas than I care to remember. I slept in it far too many times, and it’s seen temperatures from 115F+ to -30 and below. And, this winter, we rather memorably lost a tire on the drive from Austin to Vermont, resulting in me tearing up on the New York State Freeway and wondering what the hell I was doing with my life.

It all worked out in the end, or is in process of doing so. Somehow I think life is always a process of working itself out, one way or another.

I’m in the midst of welcoming a new vehicle into Fire Girl land, but, needless to say, in between a string of weeklong work trips for Orvis (about to head to the IFTD [International Fly Tackle Dealer] show in Orlando on Tuesday, matter of fact), a four-day trip to Birmingham, and the fact I now live over an hour’s drive from the nearest airport, life has been a little mad.

June and early July have been a run of 60-and 80-hour work weeks, lots of travel, and late night hours. I got home from work last night to discover the entire contents of my pantry added up to a largely empty jar of Vermont peanut butter, one packet of fancy sardines, a tub of coconut oil, and three eggs. I opted for eggs cooked in coconut oil, sardines on the side. (Questionable win.)

The fact that I had no transportation for part of that time complicated things a wee bit.

Never have I been more thankful for the little family of coworkers I have here… some pretty awesome folks helped me out in a jam and I’m been shocked by the offers of help.

Good people make all the difference.

Anyway, extremely long-winded story made short, I now, for the first time in Vermont, have truly reliable transportation to get me out in the field and on adventures. Look for more photos and stories coming your way soon.

In the meantime, be sure to avail yourself of this offer for Fire Girl readers, from the good guys over at Think Tank Photo:

Purchase any of Think Tank Photo Urban Disguise V2.0 Shoulder bag and receive two free gifts FREE!

Looking for a sweet deal on a new shoulder bag? Purchase any of Think Tank Photo’s popular Urban Disguise V2.0 shoulder bags and receive a Shoulder Harness V2.0 and a set of Urban Disguise Attachment Straps for free (a $54.50 value).  The Urban Disguise bags come in five sizes. They are intentionally designed not to look like camera bags, thus allowing you to carry even your larger lenses into potentially perilous settings. The Shoulder Harness V2.0 converts any Urban Disguise shoulder bag into a backpack and the Urban Disguise Shoulder Straps let you attach modular pouches and a small tripod/monopod.  To partake of this special offer, click on the link on each Urban Disguise’s product page on Think Tank’s website and download the special order form.  Be sure to insert this special codenumber, AP-793, into the line reading “Affiliate Code.”

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The Vermont Chronicles 29 June: Taste of Montana

by Fire Girl Jess on June 29, 2014

Not as much reading fodder this week, but a few images to boost you through your Sunday. Head on over to Chi Wulff and give it a look.

Trout sipping during a Missouri River summer day.

Trout sipping during a Missouri River summer day.

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